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Protocol - History of Head Trauma

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Protocol Name from Source:

The Ohio State University Traumatic Brain Injury Identification Method Short Form (OSU TBI-ID)

Availability:

Publicly available

Description:

The Ohio State University Traumatic Brain Injury Identification Method Short Form (OSU TBI-ID) is an interviewer-administered questionnaire that captures the lifetime history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The OSU TBI-ID gives data for calculating summary indices that reflect the likelihood that consequences have resulted from lifetime exposure to TBI.

Protocol:

I would like to ask you about injuries to your head or neck that you may have had at anytime in your life. Interviewer instruction: Record cause and any details provided spontaneously in the box at the bottom of the page. DO NOT query further about LOC or other details at this stage.

1. Have you ever been hospitalized or treated in an emergency room following an injury to your head or neck? Think about any childhood injuries you remember or were told about.

[ ] Yes - Record cause(s) in table below

[ ] No

2. Have you ever injured your head or neck in a car accident or from some other moving vehicle accident (e.g. motorcycle, ATV)?

[ ] Yes - Record cause(s) in table below

[ ] No

3. Have you ever injured your head or neck in a fall or from being hit by something (e.g. falling from a bike, horse, or rollerblades, falling on ice, being hit by a rock)? Have you ever injured your head or neck playing sports or on the playground?

[ ] Yes - Record cause(s) in table below

[ ] No

4. Have you ever injured your head or neck in a fight, from being hit by someone, or from being shaken violently? Have you ever been shot in the head?

[ ] Yes - Record cause(s) in table below

[ ] No

5. Have you ever been nearby when an explosion or a blast occurred? If you served in the military, think about any combat- or training-related incidents.

[ ] Yes - Record cause(s) in table below

[ ] No

6. If all above are "no" then proceed to question 7. If answered "yes" to any of the questions above, ask the following for each injury: Were you knocked out or did you lose consciousness (LOC)? If yes, how long? If no, were you dazed or did you have a gap in your memory from the injury? How old were you? (age is only needed if there was LOC)

Cause

Loss of consciousness (LOC)/knocked out

Dazed/Memory Gap

Age

No LOC

< 30 min

30 min-24 hrs

> 24 hrs.

Yes

No

 
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               

If more injuries with LOC:

How many more? ___

Longest knocked out?___

How many ≥ 30 mins.?___

Youngest age? ___

7. Have you ever lost consciousness from a drug overdose or being choked?

____# overdose
____# choked

SCORING

______ # TBI-LOC (number of TBI's with loss of consciousness from #6a)

______ # TBI-LOC ≥ 30 (number of TBI's with loss of consciousness ≥ 30 minutes from #6a)

______ age at first TBI-LOC (youngest age from #6a)

_____ TBI-LOC before age 15 (if youngest age from #7B < 15 then =1, if ≥ 15 then = 0)

_____ Worst Injury (1-5):

If responses to #1-5 are "no" classify as 1 "improbable TBI".

If in response to #6a and 6b reports never having LOC, being dazed or having memory lapses classify as 1 "improbable TBI".

If in response to #6b reports being dazed or having a memory lapse classify as 2 "possible TBI".

If in response to #6a loss of consciousness (LOC) does not exceed 30 minutes for any injury classify as 3 "mild TBI".

If in response to #6a LOC for any one injury is between 30 minutes and 24 hours classify as 4 "moderate TBI".

If in response to #6a LOC for any one injury exceeds 24 hours classify as 5 "severe TBI".

_______ # anoxic injuries (sum of incidents reported in #7)

This protocol was adapted with permission from the Ohio State University TBI Identification Method

© reserved 2007, The Ohio Valley Center for Brain Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation

Personnel and Training Required

The interviewer must be trained to conduct personal interviews with individuals from the general population. The interviewer must be trained and found to be competent (i.e., tested by an expert) at the completion of personal interviews.

Equipment Needs

Either a pencil-and-paper or computer-assisted instrument may be used. If a computer-assisted instrument is used, computer software may be necessary to develop the instrument. The interviewer will require a laptop computer/handheld computer to administer a computer-assisted questionnaire.

Requirements

Requirement CategoryRequired
Average time of greater than 15 minutes in an unaffected individualNo
Major equipmentNo
Specialized requirements for biospecimen collectionNo
Specialized trainingNo

Mode of Administration

Interviewer (face-to-face)

Life Stage:

Adult, Senior

Specific Instructions:

This can be administered to children under 18 by a proxy.

Research Domain Information

Release Date:

May 12, 2010

Definition

A questionnaire to determine whether an individual has had a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Purpose

This measure is used to screen an individual for a past traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI can lead to a variety of psychiatric, cognitive, and physical problems.

Selection Rationale

The Ohio State University Traumatic Brain Injury Identification Method Short Form (OSU TBI-ID) was vetted against several similar protocols and selected because it is a short, validated instrument that is based on recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and can be used to capture traumatic brain injury among military and civilian populations.

Language

English

Standards

StandardNameIDSource
Common Data Elements (CDE)Head Injury Assessment Score3076125CDE Browser
Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC)Head trauma proto62767-9LOINC

Process and Review

[link[phenx.org/node/103|Expert Review Panel 4]] (ERP 4) reviewed the measures in the Neurology, Psychiatric, and Psychosocial domains.

Guidance from ERP 4 included the following:

· No changes

Source

Corrigan, J. D., & Bogner, J. A. (2007), Initial reliability and validity of the OSU TBI identification method. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 22(6), 318-329.

General References

None

Protocol ID:

130601

Variables:

Export Variables
Variable NameVariable IDVariable DescriptionVersiondbGaP Mapping
PX130601_Hospitalized_Head_InjuryPX130601010000Have you ever been hospitalized or treated in an emergency room following an injury to your head or neck? Think about any childhood injuries you remember or were told about.4N/A
PX130601_Hospitalized_Head_Injury CausePX130601010100Cause of injury reported in question 14N/A
PX130601_Head_Or_Neck_Injury_LOCPX130601010200Were you knocked out or did you lose consciousness (LOC)? If yes, how long?4N/A
PX130601_Head_Injury_Memory_GapPX130601010300If no, were you dazed or did you have a gap in your memory from the injury?4N/A
PX130601_Head_Or_Neck_Injury_AgePX130601010400How old were you?4N/A
PX130601_Moving_Vehicle_Head_InjuryPX130601020000Have you ever injured your head or neck in a car accident or from some other moving vehicle accident (e.g. motorcycle, ATV)?4N/A
PX130601_Moving_Vehicle_Head_Injury_CausePX130601020100Cause of injury reported in question 24N/A
PX130601_Moving_Vehicle_Head_Injury_LOCPX130601020200Were you knocked out or did you lose consciousness (LOC)? If yes, how long?4N/A
PX130601_Vehicular_Head_Injury_Memory_GapPX130601020300If no, were you dazed or did you have a gap in your memory from the injury?4N/A
PX130601_Moving_Vehicle_Head_Injury_AgePX130601020400How old were you?4N/A
PX130601_Head_Injury_Fall_Hit_SportsPX130601030000Have you ever injured your head or neck in a fall or from being hit by something (e.g. falling from a bike, horse, or rollerblades, falling on ice, being hit by a rock)? Have you ever injured your head or neck playing sports or on the playground?4N/A
PX130601_Fall_Head_Injury_CausePX130601030100Cause of injury reported in question 34N/A
PX130601_Fall_Head_Injury_LOCPX130601030200Were you knocked out or did you lose consciousness (LOC)? If yes, how long?4N/A
PX130601_Fall_Head_Injury_Memory_GapPX130601030300If no, were you dazed or did you have a gap in your memory from the injury?4N/A
PX130601_Fall_Head_Injury_AgePX130601030400How old were you?4N/A
PX130601_Head_Injury_FightPX130601040000Have you ever injured your head or neck in a fight, from being hit by someone, or from being shaken violently? Have you ever been shot in the head?4N/A
PX130601_Fight_Head_Injury_CausePX130601040100Cause of injury reported in question 44N/A
PX130601_Fight_Head_Injury_LOCPX130601040200Were you knocked out or did you lose consciousness (LOC)? If yes, how long?4N/A
PX130601_Fight_Head_Injury_Memory_GapPX130601040300If no, were you dazed or did you have a gap in your memory from the injury?4N/A
PX130601_Fight_Head_Injury_AgePX130601040400How old were you?4N/A
PX130601_Explosion_Head_InjuryPX130601050000Have you ever been nearby when an explosion or a blast occurred? If you served in the military, think about any combat- or training-related incidents.4N/A
PX130601_Explosion_Head_Injury_CausePX130601050100Cause of injury reported in question 54N/A
PX130601_Explosion_Head_Injury_LOCPX130601050200Were you knocked out or did you lose consciousness (LOC)? If yes, how long?4N/A
PX130601_Explosion_Head_Injury_Memory_GapPX130601050300If no, were you dazed or did you have a gap in your memory from the injury?4N/A
PX130601_Explosion_Head_Injury_AgePX130601050400How old were you?4N/A
PX130601_Number_Other_Injuries_With_LOCPX130601060100If more injuries with LOC: How many more?4N/A
PX130601_Other_Injuries_With_LOC_LongestPX130601060200If more injuries with LOC: Longest knocked out4N/A
PX130601_Number_Other_Injuries_With_LOC_>30MinPX130601060300If more injuries with LOC: How many > 30 mins.?4N/A
PX130601_Number_Other_Injuries_With_LOC_AgePX130601060400If more injuries with LOC: Youngest age?4N/A
PX130601_LOC_From_Drug_OverdosePX130601070100Have you ever lost consciousness from a drug overdose or being choked?4N/A
PX130601_LOC_From_Being_ChokedPX130601070200Have you ever lost consciousness from a drug overdose or being choked?4N/A